2ID Manchus hone air assault skills

Base Info
A Soldier of the 2nd Infantry Division’s Company A, 2nd Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, shouts commands to his team during air assault training near Rodriguez Live Fire Complex Jan. 31. – U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Juan F. Jimenez
A Soldier of the 2nd Infantry Division’s Company A, 2nd Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, shouts commands to his team during air assault training near Rodriguez Live Fire Complex Jan. 31. – U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Juan F. Jimenez

2ID Manchus hone air assault skills

by: Sgt. Juan F. Jimenez | .
1st ABCT Public Affairs | .
published: March 09, 2013

CAMP HOVEY – ”One minute,” yelled the crew chief to the Soldiers in his UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter. “Twenty seconds,” he called out. As soon as the Black Hawk touched the ground the Soldiers, strapped with 70 pounds of their personal equipment, jumped out, laying suppressive fire as they hit the ground. The scene did not look like utter chaos because these Soldiers, from Company A, 2nd Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division, knew exactly what to do.

For two days more than 100 “Manchu” Soldiers from Company A perfected their air assault mission at Rodriguez Live Fire Complex.

“Their air assault mission is something Soldiers don’t get to do often,” said 1st Sgt. Danny Davis, the company’s senior noncommissioned officer. “Over the period of two days these Soldiers conducted drills and rehearsals. Making sure the Soldiers stay motivated and focused during training was [the company commander and my] intent and goal.”

The hours of practice paid off because the soldiers were able to demonstrate they can drop into an area and quickly target the enemy.

“The most dangerous part during an air assault is landing, and assaulting the objective,” said Davis. “That was definitely something we spent quite a bit of time on rehearsing and making sure we knew what to expect and making sure each key element knew where they were going.”

A typical air assault mission will have several helicopters drop off soldiers simultaneously. So preparing for all possible “Murphy’s Law” scenarios is part of this training.

“There are so many moving parts that just in itself makes this [the air assault mission] challenging,” said Sgt. 1st Class James H. Clayton, platoon sergeant, 1st Platoon, Company A. “Conducting an air assault isn’t something these Soldiers get to do often, so this opportunity allows the unit to expand their training in an offensive manner.”

Pvt. Ryan M. Barr, a rifleman, said he has several reasons to be excited about this training – his first time on a helicopter, first air assault mission and firstexercise with his company.

“The ride on the Black Hawk was a rush,” explained Barr, who arrived at the company straight from infantry school. “When I heard my sergeant yell ‘Go,’ my adrenaline kicked in and muscle memory took over. Everything was smooth, with no surprises.”

With the mission concluding as planned, the Soldiers received the training their leaders intended, demonstrating that they are always ready to fight.

“No matter the terrain or weather, we have the capability to come down on them [enemy] at any moment,” said Clayton.

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