Dirty Jobs: Motor pool Monday

Base Info
CAMP CASEY, South Korea -- Pfc. Shaun Lindsey, from Midlothian, Va., a field artillery automated tactical data systems specialist assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 210th Field Artillery Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division, removes an oil pan from under his Humvee to check for fluid leaks during Motorpool Monday on Camp Casey, South Korea, Aug.11. Photo Credit: Cpl. Song Gunwoo (2d ID)
CAMP CASEY, South Korea -- Pfc. Shaun Lindsey, from Midlothian, Va., a field artillery automated tactical data systems specialist assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 210th Field Artillery Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division, removes an oil pan from under his Humvee to check for fluid leaks during Motorpool Monday on Camp Casey, South Korea, Aug.11. Photo Credit: Cpl. Song Gunwoo (2d ID)

Dirty Jobs: Motor pool Monday

by: Spc. Sara E. Wiseman (2d ID) | .
U.S. Army | .
published: August 24, 2014

CAMP CASEY, South Korea -- The smell of love is in the air! Wait, that's just oil.

Whether on the Korean peninsula or in the states, Mondays mean getting under the hood of your assigned military vehicle, and performing operator preventative maintenance checks and services (PMCS).

On August 11, the standard was no different. Soldiers across the 210th Field Artillery Brigade at Camp Casey, South Korea, spent their morning digging down into the guts of their Humvees in search of leaking fluids and mechanical issues before risking it on the road.

Manned with their trusty technical manuals and equipment maintenance and inspection worksheet, or DA Form 5988-E, Soldiers were able to locate and document any problems going on with their vehicles, generators, or trailers. Sometimes, they even get a second breakfast.

"I've had the misfortune of tasting every fluid the vehicles run on," said Sgt. Charles Descalzi, from Seattle, Wash., a wheeled vehicle mechanic assigned to 70th Brigade Support Battalion, 210th FA Bde., 2nd Infantry Division. "Anti freeze and transmission fluids are pretty sweet, almost like candy. Oil though, not so much."

Despite the taste of victory being close at hand, the consequences of not properly completing a PMCS, can lead to severe consequences.

"If a tire falls off because someone didn't check the torque, or one vehicle in a convoy breaks down, you're a sitting duck," said Descalzi. "You don't want to be rolling out to the front lines risking an accident that can be easily prevented."

Consistently and accurately wrenching through PMCS every Monday is one of the ways that leaders of the 210th FA Bde., are able to maintain unit readiness.

"By doing these checks on equipment, Soldiers are developing trust and confidence in their vehicles," said 1st Lt. Matt Deschene, from Nashwood, N.H., the executive officer of Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 210th FA Bde., 2nd Inf. Div.

"Understanding each piece of equipment through technical manuals and PMCS is how they're going be ready to "Fight Tonight"."

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