Humphreys 5th Annual Breast Cancer Walk, Run and Race draws nearly 200

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Katie Hampton, a three-year survivor of breast cancer delivered poignant remarks about her diagnosis, treatment and recovery from Stage 2B Triple negative breast cancer. Hampton is a Special Education teacher at Humphreys Middle School. (Photo Credit: Bob McElroy)
Katie Hampton, a three-year survivor of breast cancer delivered poignant remarks about her diagnosis, treatment and recovery from Stage 2B Triple negative breast cancer. Hampton is a Special Education teacher at Humphreys Middle School. (Photo Credit: Bob McElroy)

Humphreys 5th Annual Breast Cancer Walk, Run and Race draws nearly 200

by: Bob McElroy, USAG Humphreys Public Affairs | .
U.S. Army | .
published: October 14, 2015

CAMP HUMPHREYS - Nearly 200 people gathered at the Humphreys High School track on a beautiful morning Oct. 3 for the 5th Annual Breast Cancer Awareness Run/Walk/ Race.

Laura Holland, wife of Humphreys Garrison commander Col. Joseph C. Holland, opened the event with brief remarks.

"Thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedules to unite as a community to honor breast cancer survivors and raise awareness about steps we can take to reduce the risk of developing breast cancer," Holland said.

According to the website breastcancer.org, one in eight women will develop breast cancer in their lifetime. Holland said that more American women died from breast cancer than any other cancer except lung cancer.

"An estimated 231,840 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in the U.S. in 2015," she said.

Holland said that cancer.org offers five ways women can protect their breast health--watch their weight, exercise regularly, limit time spent sitting, limit alcohol consumption and avoid or limit hormone-replacement therapy.

After giving instructions for the races and walk, Holland introduced Humphreys Middle School Special Education teacher Katie Hampton, a three-year survivor of breast cancer.

Hampton shared her story of diagnosis, treatment and recovery. It began when she discovered a golf-ball sized lump in her breast and learned it was Stage 2B Triple negative breast cancer.

Triple negative breast cancer occurs in 10 to 20 percent of diagnosed breast cancers and can be more aggressive and difficult to treat than other forms of cancer, according to http://www.nationalbreastcancer.org/triple-negative-breast-cancer. It's also more likely to spread and reoccur.

Hampton underwent a mastectomy at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and now takes the drug Tamoxifen to ward off reoccurrences of the cancer. She has check-ups every six months and must take Tamoxifen for seven years.

"Cancer does not discriminate," Hampton said. "I fought this for my daughter and my family. Be determined, know your body and get checked."

Following the remarks, the participants walked silently around the track in memory of those who had died from cancer.

"Today, together as a community, we will begin our walk with one silent lap in memory of those who have fought valiantly against this disease but who are no longer with us," Holland said.

After the silent tribute there were several races for kids and adults--100, 400 and 1,600-meter races. Benji the Blackhawk, the Humphreys High School mascot made an appearance, walked several times around the track and socialized with the participants.

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