Jersey Devils run with the pack

Base Info
Airmen from the New Jersey Air National Guard discuss a maintenance plan to prepare their F-16 Fighting Falcon for a training sortie at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, June 11, 2014. The Airmen are part of a Theater Security Package designed to deploy additional fighters, tankers and Airmen to locations across the Pacific reinforcing the U.S. commitment to its allies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Armando A. Schwier-Morales/Released)
Airmen from the New Jersey Air National Guard discuss a maintenance plan to prepare their F-16 Fighting Falcon for a training sortie at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, June 11, 2014. The Airmen are part of a Theater Security Package designed to deploy additional fighters, tankers and Airmen to locations across the Pacific reinforcing the U.S. commitment to its allies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Armando A. Schwier-Morales/Released)

Jersey Devils run with the pack

by: Senior Airmen Armando A. Schwier-Morales and Taylor Curry, 8th Fighter Wing Public Affairs | .
Kunsan Air Base | .
published: July 12, 2014

KUNSAN AIR BASE, Republic of Korea -- Flying from the beaches of New Jersey, F-16 Fighting Falcons and support personnel touched down on Kunsan's coast and joined the Wolf Pack family at the end of May 2014.

The New Jersey Air National Guardsmen were also joined by their sister unit from the District of Columbia to form a Theater Security Package that routinely deploys additional fighters, tankers, equipment and personnel to bolster U.S. forces across the Asia-Pacific region.

TSPs began rotating to the Pacific in 2004. The Wolf Pack's newest members are joining for approximately three to four months to train alongside RoK allies and partners.

"We are part of a 12-ship TSP, bringing over 200 Airmen with us," said Lt. Col. John Cosgrove, 119th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Unit officer in charge. "We bring these aircraft here to keep the number of jets on the peninsula at a steady number, and to support the armistice. We have fully integrated with the Wolf Pack to be ready for any kind of contingency."

Cosgrove mentioned that keeping these jets flying and ensuring these weapon systems continue to work is a top priority.

"It's pretty exciting to see all these jets taking off every day and see the camaraderie here on the base," said Cosgrove. "It's great to be part of the 3,000 Airmen working together to help our allies in South Korea ... This is an amazing opportunity for our Airmen that only get to work with jets on the weekend back home; here they get 40-60 hours a week with the jets."

Despite combating the hardship of being away from their families and enduring South Korea's humidness during this time, the guest Airmen strive to do their finest.

"Being part of the Wolf Pack has been a great opportunity for me," said Senior Airman Weston Basinger, 113th District of Columbia Air National Guard crew chief. "I've already learned so much just seeing how active duty operates. The Wolf Pack's mission here is an important one, and I feel honored being able to assist."

According to Cosgrove, the newest members of the Wolf Pack family and the TSP are another way to ensure the pack is able to deter aggression.

"Our integration has been exceptional," said Lt. Col. Timothy Hassel, 119th Fighter Squadron commander. "We know the Wolf Pack has accepted us into the Wing, and we are ready to take the fight north if required."

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