SFS demonstrates K-9 capabilities for ROKAF

Base Info
Senior Airman Otho Nugent, 51st Security Forces Squadron military working dog handler, commands his MWD to release Republic of Korea Air Force Staff Sgt. Yook, Young-Il, during a demonstration at the Osan Air Base kennel Sept. 24, 2012. Four members of the ROKAF Air Police Squadron had the chance to wear a ‘bite jacket’ and experience take down procedures during the demonstration. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Alexis Siekert)
Senior Airman Otho Nugent, 51st Security Forces Squadron military working dog handler, commands his MWD to release Republic of Korea Air Force Staff Sgt. Yook, Young-Il, during a demonstration at the Osan Air Base kennel Sept. 24, 2012. Four members of the ROKAF Air Police Squadron had the chance to wear a ‘bite jacket’ and experience take down procedures during the demonstration. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Alexis Siekert)

SFS demonstrates K-9 capabilities for ROKAF

by: Airman 1st Class Alexis Siekert, 51st Fighter Wing | .
Public Affairs | .
published: September 28, 2012

9/27/2012 - OSAN AIR BASE, Republic of Korea -- Members from the Republic of Korea Air Police Squadron at Osan Air Base had the opportunity to watch military working dogs in action during attack, bite and takedown scenarios at the base kennel Sept. 24, 2012.

The 51st Security Forces Squadron MWD section invited their ROK counterparts to a demonstration to highlight the working dogs' significant contribution to the squadron's mission, explained Tech. Sgt. Eric Morales, 51st SFS MWD kennel master.

"The importance of this demonstration was to show our ROKAF counterparts, the security police, what we can do with our military working dogs," he said. "We can use them for patrol, locating the bad guy, and use them in our narcotic or explosive detection."

The ROKAF Airmen received a capabilities briefing, toured the kennel and watched as the MWDs showed their toughness.

ROKAF Staff Sgt. Yook, Young-Il, was one of four volunteers to wear a 'bite jacket' and experience take down procedures during the demonstration.

"That was really fun," he said. "[The bite jacket] was a lot lighter than I thought, but at the same time it was very well protected. I could feel the dog biting but it didn't hurt or anything so, it was certainly well protected."

Most importantly, the tour helped to reinforce the working relationship between the two units, Morales said.

"When we're working at night together or when we're working in wartime operations, we can understand each other," said Morales of the two units. "We build more of a rapport when we can work together. We can then help each other out if needed."

The demonstration was the first in more than three years between the units, and proved to be beneficial to both sides, Yook explained.

"When the air police work around the gate, you see the military dogs often moving around," he said. "I think it's a really good experience to come here and see how they actually train and what kind of environment they live in. I think it's a good experience to see what they actually go through.

"I think it would be good if we have a tour like this every once in awhile, once every three months or something like that," he added. "Then our police can actually experience what it's like having a dog around."

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