Two Kunsan Airmen selected for test pilot school

Base Info
Capt. Philip Jackson, 8th Operations Support Squadron combat training chief, signals to his crew chief prior to a training sortie at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Feb. 13, 2014. Jackson was one of two Wolf Pack pilots accepted into the Air Forces test pilot school, where students are trained and tested on their ability to adapt and become an Air Force test pilot. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Armando A. Schwier-Morales/Released)
Capt. Philip Jackson, 8th Operations Support Squadron combat training chief, signals to his crew chief prior to a training sortie at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Feb. 13, 2014. Jackson was one of two Wolf Pack pilots accepted into the Air Forces test pilot school, where students are trained and tested on their ability to adapt and become an Air Force test pilot. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Armando A. Schwier-Morales/Released)

Two Kunsan Airmen selected for test pilot school

by: Senior Airman Armando A. Schwier-Morales, 8th Fighter Wing Public Affairs | .
Kunsan Air Base | .
published: March 15, 2014

KUNSAN AIR BASE, Republic of Korea -- Two Wolf Pack Airmen roared into the beginning of their dream job by being selected for the Air Force test pilot school.

Capt. Philip Jackson, 8th Operations Support Squadron combat training chief, and Capt. Mark Vahle, 8th Operations Group standardization and evaluation chief, were chosen to attend the Air Force test pilot school. The school specifically trains pilots to monitor, manage and perform flight tests on research, experimental or production-type aerospace vehicles and weapons systems.

"Program graduates have profound strategic impact on future combat capabilities, so selection is highly competitive," said Maj. Miles Middleton, Air Force Personnel Center special assignments branch, in an Air Force press release. "Graduates are future senior leaders who will help shape our national security. Identifying the right people for this opportunity was critical."

After a nine-month application process, the two Wolf Pack Airmen faced a flying interview with a variety of aircraft they were not accustomed to. Yet, neither of the pilots were deterred as both had set their sights on TPS long ago.

For Vahle, the spark to become a test pilot was fueled during his college years.

"Attending test pilot school has been a dream of mine since college," said Vahle. "In college, I remember walking by portraits of the Mercury and Apollo astronauts [many of whom are U.S. Air Force TPS graduates], and thinking about the courage and skill the first test pilots and astronauts must have had. At that point, I committed myself to work as hard as I could to be part of the team that tests new aircraft and systems, identifies limitations and determines solutions to problems."

And just like Vahle, Jackson took action to reach TPS during his college years.

"I always wanted to be a test pilot; ever since I was a freshman in college," said Jackson. "I started with a general love for aviation and it turned out that developmental testing was the most fulfilling to me."

Both Airmen have had similar paths as both fly the F-16 Fighting Falcon and have operated in a variety of theaters including Iraq, Afghanistan and now the Republic of Korea.

"To be in Korea as a third theater for me is something that I can bring back to the development test world and say 'I have seen the needs of the Air Force in action in multiple different theaters and hopefully we can develop better combat systems suited for all these regions,'" said Jackson.

While acceptance into the TPS does not guarantee a test pilot position, both Airmen say they are ready and confident that they will face the coming challenges at full throttle.

Tags: Base Info
Related Content: No related content is available