Vigilant Ace 16: Delayed disaster team saves lives

Base Info
Senior Airman Nicholas Burns, 51st Dental Squadron prophylactics technician, acts as an augmentee during readiness exercise Vigilant Ace 16 on Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Nov. 3, 2015. Burns simulated having a broken wrist and was triaged and given an IV with pain medication. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Kristin High)
Senior Airman Nicholas Burns, 51st Dental Squadron prophylactics technician, acts as an augmentee during readiness exercise Vigilant Ace 16 on Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Nov. 3, 2015. Burns simulated having a broken wrist and was triaged and given an IV with pain medication. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Kristin High)

Vigilant Ace 16: Delayed disaster team saves lives

by: Senior Airman Kristin High, 51st Fighter Wing Public Affairs | .
Osan Air Base | .
published: November 14, 2015

OSAN AIR BASE, Republic of Korea -- Throughout readiness exercise Vigilant Ace 16 members of the 51st Medical Operations Squadron were faced with multiple challenges.

Injured augmentees were taken to the medical group. Depending on the severity, some augmentees were treated in emergency services and the non-emergency augmentees were brought to the delayed disaster team.

"The room here can hold more than 150 litters for the sick or injured," said Capt. Christina McGill, 51st Medical Operations Squadron clinical nurse. "The triage time is around two hours including stabilizing them and preparing them for flight."

This exercise provided the opportunity to test three doctors and five nurses from the delayed disaster team.

"This room is specifically set up for patients who need medical air evacuation," said McGill. "If they are not treated within a certain amount of time, their wounds could potentially become life threatening."

The team members in the delayed disaster team are devoted to saving life, limb or eyesight, if they can be saved.

"The least significant we would treat in this area would be a fracture or broken arm," she continued. "The most severe would have to be anyone needing immediate surgery."

The Airmen practiced as if it were real-world situations, administering IVs, securing splints and giving patients pain medication if necessary.

"We want to make sure the patients are staying stabilized and prepared for flight as soon as the bird lands," said McGill.

MDOS, medical, triage, exercise, Vigilant Ace 16, PACAF, PACOM, 51st Fighter Wing, Osan Air Base, South Korea

Tags: Osan, Base Info
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