Walker 'Million March' highlights child abuse prevention month

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Many volunteers and the ACS Family Advocacy Program team helped the march get started with a supportive community to raise awareness to help prevent child abuse. (Photo Nam, Young-ho)
Many volunteers and the ACS Family Advocacy Program team helped the march get started with a supportive community to raise awareness to help prevent child abuse. (Photo Nam, Young-ho)

Walker 'Million March' highlights child abuse prevention month

by: Nam, Young-ho | .
The Morning Calm | .
published: May 11, 2013

DAEGU GARRISON — The month of April gave USAG Daegu and Area IV an opportunity to participate in a number events. From the military child, to sexual assault, April was a month of information and awareness. Thanks to the good work of ACS on Camp Henry, the "Million March" was also a successful event. The April 22 activity was set aside to highlight Child Abuse Prevention, and resulted in a gathering of the Area IV community to participate in a march around Camp Walker.

According to Sylvia Flores, Family Advocacy Program Manager, ACS, Camp Henry, "Unfortunately, child abuse and neglect happens all over the world. It happens on military installations and is carried out by military and government personnel. The "Million March" was one way to bring about awareness of the need for greater child abuse prevention, and the fact that we need to pay more attention to our children."

The Department of Defense strongly supports awareness activities that help educate communities about the importance of child abuse prevention. The "Million March" event included participants from the USAG Daegu Fire Department, the Military Police, the Criminal Investigation Division, the USO, and of major significance, students from Daegu American School, and Camp Walker's Child Development Center.

With sirens blaring, whistles blowing, and the crowd repeatedly yelling "Stand up for children," the march proceeded through Camp Walker without a hitch. To add to the afternoon event, tables were set up to educate children and family members on the importance of emergency information such as child identification, DNA samples, and fingerprinting, as well as instructions on how to respond if a child gets lost or is missing.

"We have to make a commitment to stand up for our children. At ACS, we realize people can become stressed, but it is important for them to know that there are resources available to help them. They just need to contact ACS to find out what those resources are. This can help reduce the stress, and allows them to choose a better life for their child or children," Flores said.

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