WIT tests Wolf Pack readiness in BM-15-3

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An F-16 Fighting Falcon crew chief gives the 80th Fighter Squadron’s “Crush ‘em” gesture in full exercise gear to a pilot as he marshals the jet out of a hardened aircraft shelter during Exercise Beverly Midnight 15-3 at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, May 2, 2015.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Taylor Curry)
An F-16 Fighting Falcon crew chief gives the 80th Fighter Squadron’s “Crush ‘em” gesture in full exercise gear to a pilot as he marshals the jet out of a hardened aircraft shelter during Exercise Beverly Midnight 15-3 at Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, May 2, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Taylor Curry)

WIT tests Wolf Pack readiness in BM-15-3

by: Senior Airman Divine Cox | .
8th Fighter Wing PAO | .
published: May 08, 2015

KUNSAN AIR BASE, Republic of Korea-- -- The sound of phones ringing rippled through the dormitories of the 8th Fighter Wing at approximately 4 a.m., as operational readiness exercise Beverly Midnight 15-3 kicked off here at Kunsan AB, April 28.

For the next six days, Airmen and their units were inspected and evaluated on simulated wartime scenarios by a team of select individuals. These evaluators are known as the wing inspection team.
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The WIT program is run by the 8th FW inspector general's office. The intent of the program is to inspect, document and educate Airmen on how to perform their jobs in any scenario.

"During exercises, WIT works directly for the inspector general," said Lt. Col. Christopher Heber, 8th FW inspector general. "They inspect and report all write ups to the wing commander to see how the wing is doing in meeting regulation compliance and mission effectiveness requirements."

Kunsan implemented the new commander inspection program about six months ago and it is an important part of improving the Wolf Pack's mission to defend the base, accept follow-on forces, and take the fight north.

Heber said the new program is unique because it truly empowers the wing commander to tailor their exercise to their wing's specific mission.

"This new program is extremely beneficial," said Heber. "Wing commanders know their wing's mission better than anyone else, so these scenarios implemented during these exercises are geared towards making us better as a wing."

During the exercise, the 8th Civil Engineer Squadron fire department had to respond to a structures fire while being inspected by Master Sgt. Shawn Chenault, 8th CES assistant fire chief and WIT member.

"The WIT program gears Airmen up for real world situations by learning and growing from their mistakes in a controlled environment," said Chenault, "It's okay to make mistakes. We as people make mistakes every day; we just have to learn from them and get better."

The Wolf Pack has been performing well during exercises under the new inspection program since its arrival early December.

"I have learned a lot from these exercise scenarios, which include self-aid buddy care, post attack reconnaissance sweeps, and chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear training," said Staff Sgt. Kenyan Hudson, 8th Comptroller Squadron deputy disbursing officer. "The WIT members really do a good job stepping in only when we need help."

The WIT worked tirelessly around the clock to ensure that their respective units were executing each scenario flawlessly and correcting anything that was non-compliant to the inspection.

The IG office will continue to work with WIT members to find ways to strengthen the program so Airmen can continue to execute the mission.

"Our wing inspection team really leads by example," said Heber. "They work hard and inspect hard so that the Wolf Pack will be ready to fight tonight at a moment's notice."

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