Website teaches how to deal with bullying

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DODEA Director, Marilee Fitzgerald asks Ms. Melinda Draper’s class, Zama American Middle School, about the benefits of having a wireless laptops for every student during the 2012-13 school year. Photos courtesy of Department of Defense Education Activity, Pacific
DODEA Director, Marilee Fitzgerald asks Ms. Melinda Draper’s class, Zama American Middle School, about the benefits of having a wireless laptops for every student during the 2012-13 school year. Photos courtesy of Department of Defense Education Activity, Pacific

Website teaches how to deal with bullying

by: Lisa Daniel | .
American Forces Press Service | .
published: August 20, 2013

The start of school is a good time to talk to children about the complicated and heartbreaking problem of bullying. Fortunately, the Department of Defense Education Activity has its own webpage on bullying prevention with advice for parents and kids.

For parents:

  • If your child is being bullied, talk to his or her teacher instead of confronting the bully’s parents. If no action is taken, talk to the principal;
  • Teach your child nonviolent ways to deal with bullies, like walking away or talking it out;
  • Role-play bullying scenarios with your child and help your child act with self-confidence;
  • Practice walking upright, looking people in the eye, and speaking clearly;
  • Don’t encourage your child to fight – he or she could get hurt, get in trouble or start more serious problems with the bully; and
  • Involve your children in activities outside of school so they know they can make friends in a different social circle.

For children:

  • If you are bullied at school, tell your teacher, school counselor, or principal. Telling is not tattling;
  • Tell your parents or other trusted adults. They can help stop the bullying;
  • Don’t fight back. Don’t try to bully those who bully you;
  • Try not to show anger or fear. Students who bully like to see that they can upset you; and
  • Try not to be alone in places where bullying is likely to happen, such as bathrooms or locker rooms.

Most of our children will witness or be part of bullying in some form or another. Sometimes it is subtle and can leave kids confused about when someone has crossed the line, when something that may start as playful teasing isn’t funny anymore. Bullying prevention programs seek to help kids understand what bullying is and how they can prevent it.

– By Lisa Daniel, American Forces Press Service

Tags: Education
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