China repeats claim on South China Sea, despite court ruling

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This photo from May 2015 shows a Chinese airstrip under construction at Fiery Cross Reef, part of the disputed Spratly Islands in the South China Sea. The artificial island now includes a military-capable airstrip, possible gun emplacements, radar towers, helipads and communications equipment, according to the Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative. Courtesy of the U.S. Navy
From Stripes.com
This photo from May 2015 shows a Chinese airstrip under construction at Fiery Cross Reef, part of the disputed Spratly Islands in the South China Sea. The artificial island now includes a military-capable airstrip, possible gun emplacements, radar towers, helipads and communications equipment, according to the Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative. Courtesy of the U.S. Navy

China repeats claim on South China Sea, despite court ruling

by: Erik Slavin | .
Stars and Stripes | .
published: July 13, 2016
China’s actions in the South China Sea violate international law and prevent other nations from exercising their rights, an international court ruled Tuesday in a unanimous landmark decision that bolsters arguments by nations critical of Beijing’s military moves in the Asia-Pacific region.
 
The Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague ruled in favor of most of the Philippines’ claims against China, while determining that historical claims to 90 percent of the South China Sea — labeled “indisputable” by Beijing — had no legal justification. 
 
“There was no evidence that China had historically exercised exclusive control over the waters of the South China Sea or prevented other States from exploiting their resources,” the tribunal wrote in a statement accompanying the 479-page ruling.
 
China’s state media quickly dismissed the ruling, and the Foreign Ministry repeated Beijing’s claim to the area. The Foreign Ministry said the Philippines move to take the issue to court without Beijing’s consent was in “bad faith” and violated international law.
 
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