Life as a language instructor in Korea

News

Life as a language instructor in Korea

by: Kendra Moore | .
Stripes Korea | .
published: October 05, 2016

Annalesa Feiden (Feiden means “faithful friend”), is an American teaching in South Korea as a language instructor.  Here is a little glimpse of her life in Korea.

What made you decide to teach in Korea?

"I decided to teach here after a study abroad experience here.  I wanted to travel and to learn more about my true passion.  I wanted to get to learn Korea more, and learn about Korean culture and Korean language.  So, I decided to come back and teach - - - but only - for 1 year".

What has been the most exciting experience as a teacher in Korea?

"I guess, if I was a little choosey, I guess, that recognizing what I taught has made a lasting impact" For example, I teach a speech writing course, and I got some feedback from a student who is still using that outline that I taught them - for other courses and that it was helpful.  "And that just felt really rewarding, because you usually don't get that kind of feedback.  So that was really exciting for me"

What has been a challenge for you living in Korea as a teacher?

"I think the biggest challenge, has been teaching mixed level".  It can be a real challenge to meet everyone's needs when their levels are different (language ability).

How long have you been working here?

I've been working in Korea since 2007.  I have been working at DIMA (Donga-Institute of Media & Arts) since 2009.  (9 years)

What has made you decide to stay so long?

"The reason I stayed... I really like the mutual respect between me and the boss.  I feel like she gives me enough trust to do my own thing and to manage my courses and content.  I like that respect and independence.  And I really like that it's a broadcasting Arts school.  I think the students are quite unique.  They seem so energetic and so outgoing, and I really respect them for taking on a challenging major.  Because in Korea, it seems like people would take a "safe" major like business or something like that but to take on acting or singing is a lot riskier.

Anything else you would like to say or add?

"I'm grateful for this experience and I'm looking forward to what's to come."

- See more at: http://korea.stripes.com/news/life-language-instructor-korea#sthash.7DGw...

Annalesa Feiden (Feiden means “faithful friend”), is an American teaching in South Korea as a language instructor.  Here is a little glimpse of her life in Korea.

What made you decide to teach in Korea?

"I decided to teach here after a study abroad experience here.  I wanted to travel and to learn more about my true passion.  I wanted to get to learn Korea more, and learn about Korean culture and Korean language.  So, I decided to come back and teach - - - but only - for 1 year".

What has been the most exciting experience as a teacher in Korea?

"I guess, if I was a little choosey, I guess, that recognizing what I taught has made a lasting impact" For example, I teach a speech writing course, and I got some feedback from a student who is still using that outline that I taught them - for other courses and that it was helpful.  "And that just felt really rewarding, because you usually don't get that kind of feedback.  So that was really exciting for me"

What has been a challenge for you living in Korea as a teacher?

"I think the biggest challenge, has been teaching mixed level".  It can be a real challenge to meet everyone's needs when their levels are different (language ability).

How long have you been working here?

I've been working in Korea since 2007.  I have been working at DIMA (Donga-Institute of Media & Arts) since 2009.  (9 years)

What has made you decide to stay so long?

"The reason I stayed... I really like the mutual respect between me and the boss.  I feel like she gives me enough trust to do my own thing and to manage my courses and content.  I like that respect and independence.  And I really like that it's a broadcasting Arts school.  I think the students are quite unique.  They seem so energetic and so outgoing, and I really respect them for taking on a challenging major.  Because in Korea, it seems like people would take a "safe" major like business or something like that but to take on acting or singing is a lot riskier.

Anything else you would like to say or add?

"I'm grateful for this experience and I'm looking forward to what's to come."

- See more at: http://korea.stripes.com/news/life-language-instructor-korea#sthash.7DGw...

Annalesa Feiden (Feiden means “faithful friend”), is an American teaching in South Korea as a language instructor.  Here is a little glimpse of her life in Korea.

What made you decide to teach in Korea?

"I decided to teach here after a study abroad experience here.  I wanted to travel and to learn more about my true passion.  I wanted to get to learn Korea more, and learn about Korean culture and Korean language.  So, I decided to come back and teach - - - but only - for 1 year".

What has been the most exciting experience as a teacher in Korea?

"I guess, if I was a little choosey, I guess, that recognizing what I taught has made a lasting impact" For example, I teach a speech writing course, and I got some feedback from a student who is still using that outline that I taught them - for other courses and that it was helpful.  "And that just felt really rewarding, because you usually don't get that kind of feedback.  So that was really exciting for me"

What has been a challenge for you living in Korea as a teacher?

"I think the biggest challenge, has been teaching mixed level".  It can be a real challenge to meet everyone's needs when their levels are different (language ability).

How long have you been working here?

I've been working in Korea since 2007.  I have been working at DIMA (Donga-Institute of Media & Arts) since 2009.  (9 years)

What has made you decide to stay so long?

"The reason I stayed... I really like the mutual respect between me and the boss.  I feel like she gives me enough trust to do my own thing and to manage my courses and content.  I like that respect and independence.  And I really like that it's a broadcasting Arts school.  I think the students are quite unique.  They seem so energetic and so outgoing, and I really respect them for taking on a challenging major.  Because in Korea, it seems like people would take a "safe" major like business or something like that but to take on acting or singing is a lot riskier.

Anything else you would like to say or add?

"I'm grateful for this experience and I'm looking forward to what's to come."

- See more at: http://korea.stripes.com/news/life-language-instructor-korea#sthash.7DGw...

Annalesa Feiden (Feiden means “faithful friend”), is an American teaching in South Korea as a language instructor.  Here is a little glimpse of her life in Korea.

What made you decide to teach in Korea?

"I decided to teach here after a study abroad experience here.  I wanted to travel and to learn more about my true passion.  I wanted to get to learn Korea more, and learn about Korean culture and Korean language.  So, I decided to come back and teach - - - but only - for 1 year".

What has been the most exciting experience as a teacher in Korea?

"I guess, if I was a little choosey, I guess, that recognizing what I taught has made a lasting impact" For example, I teach a speech writing course, and I got some feedback from a student who is still using that outline that I taught them - for other courses and that it was helpful.  "And that just felt really rewarding, because you usually don't get that kind of feedback.  So that was really exciting for me"

What has been a challenge for you living in Korea as a teacher?

"I think the biggest challenge, has been teaching mixed level".  It can be a real challenge to meet everyone's needs when their levels are different (language ability).

How long have you been working here?

I've been working in Korea since 2007.  I have been working at DIMA (Donga-Institute of Media & Arts) since 2009.  (9 years)

What has made you decide to stay so long?

"The reason I stayed... I really like the mutual respect between me and the boss.  I feel like she gives me enough trust to do my own thing and to manage my courses and content.  I like that respect and independence.  And I really like that it's a broadcasting Arts school.  I think the students are quite unique.  They seem so energetic and so outgoing, and I really respect them for taking on a challenging major.  Because in Korea, it seems like people would take a "safe" major like business or something like that but to take on acting or singing is a lot riskier.

Anything else you would like to say or add?

"I'm grateful for this experience and I'm looking forward to what's to come."

- See more at: http://korea.stripes.com/news/life-language-instructor-korea#sthash.7DGw...

Annalesa Feiden (Feiden means “faithful friend”), is an American teaching in South Korea as a language instructor.  Here is a little glimpse of her life in Korea.

What made you decide to teach in Korea?

"I decided to teach here after a study abroad experience here.  I wanted to travel and to learn more about my true passion.  I wanted to get to learn Korea more, and learn about Korean culture and Korean language.  So, I decided to come back and teach - - - but only - for 1 year".

What has been the most exciting experience as a teacher in Korea?

"I guess, if I was a little choosey, I guess, that recognizing what I taught has made a lasting impact" For example, I teach a speech writing course, and I got some feedback from a student who is still using that outline that I taught them - for other courses and that it was helpful.  "And that just felt really rewarding, because you usually don't get that kind of feedback.  So that was really exciting for me"

What has been a challenge for you living in Korea as a teacher?

"I think the biggest challenge, has been teaching mixed level".  It can be a real challenge to meet everyone's needs when their levels are different (language ability).

How long have you been working here?

I've been working in Korea since 2007.  I have been working at DIMA (Donga-Institute of Media & Arts) since 2009.  (9 years)

What has made you decide to stay so long?

"The reason I stayed... I really like the mutual respect between me and the boss.  I feel like she gives me enough trust to do my own thing and to manage my courses and content.  I like that respect and independence.  And I really like that it's a broadcasting Arts school.  I think the students are quite unique.  They seem so energetic and so outgoing, and I really respect them for taking on a challenging major.  Because in Korea, it seems like people would take a "safe" major like business or something like that but to take on acting or singing is a lot riskier.

Anything else you would like to say or add?

"I'm grateful for this experience and I'm looking forward to what's to come."

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