Site manager is the cheerful face behind processing CAC cards

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Site manager is the cheerful face behind processing CAC cards

by: Park, Bit-Na | .
USAG Daegu PAO | .
published: November 17, 2015

DAEGU GARRISON — There’s an old American proverb that goes “The secret of life is not to do what you like, but to like what you do.” That saying couldn’t be more fitting for Je Me Park-Hill. Many of us know her as the lady from the I.D. card office on Camp Henry who always smiles and is kind to everyone. However, in a more official capacity, she is a Site Security Manager (SSM) who ensures you have the coveted Common Access Card (CAC) that is necessary to access your government computer, enter military installations, and make purchases at the commissary, and AAFES shopping facilities.

  Park-Hill meets more people in a week, than most others do in two. Always cheerful, and ready to help any customer that comes through her office door, her positive attitude and friendly disposition makes a difference to every Soldier, family member, DoD civilian, retiree, KATUSA, and other authorized personnel seeking her assistance.

  It is no secret that in order to gain access to a U.S. military installation, or a U.S. government computer, the CAC is essential. Therefore, exactly who is in possession of the card is extremely important. Park-Hill explained that the card is specifically designed for the use of members of the uniformed services, their family members, and other authorized personnel. Her office handles the needs of those individuals who must have CAC access. Whether new to USAG Daegu and Area IV, or a long time member of the community, it isn’t difficult to become confused over the issuance of a CAC or a regular identification card.

  According to Park-Hill, “The difference between a CAC and a regular I.D. card is the Common Access Card determines user eligibility for computer access. Based on the individual’s status, the CAC card further provides other privileges as well. The identification card (I.D.) on the other hand, does not allow for computer access, but it does provide eligible family members access to other privileges.

Addressing the amount of time it takes to have a card processed, Park-Hill said, “The average “wait time” to have an I.D. card made depends on what the individual’s particular needs will be. It could take from five to fifteen minutes. You cannot get a new CAC in 10 minutes if you just want to change you picture on the CAC. Situations that allow for the renewal of a card could include if the CAC is torn or damaged, if the individual’s appearance has changed. For example, if the person has gained or lost weight or displays significant hair loss.” Further addressing the processing of the card, Park-Hill stated, “Some of the things that can cause a delay in a person getting their card processed sometimes include if the person is not found in the system, and or may not have the correct documentation that when they come in.”

  Such documentation, according to the site manager answers the question of what the individual is doing and why. “The individual must have two forms of identification.  If you are a Korean, those two forms must be translated. If the CAC has been lost, the individual must report the loss to the appropriate Military Police (MP) officials, then go to the unit and have a memorandum drafted. That memorandum will require the signature of a lieutenant colonel or GS-14. A report of the lost or stolen card must be obtained from the MP officials. They will also stamp the memorandum,” Park-Hill said.

As a host of other documents –passport, driver’s license, birth certificate, all may be necessary, a good rule of thumb is to call 768-7000 in advance for any additional information or for further clarification. Identification card assistance is in Bldg. 1307, directly across from HQ USAG Daegu on Camp Henry.
 

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