US experts predict better Japan-South Kroea ties

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Japan Prime Minister Shinzo Abe answers questions at a press conference in Tokyo in November 2014. Three security and diplomacy experts on Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015, positively evaluated Abe's remarks on the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II and expressed expectations for improvement of Japan-South Korea relations.  Shizuo Kambayashi, file/AP
Japan Prime Minister Shinzo Abe answers questions at a press conference in Tokyo in November 2014. Three security and diplomacy experts on Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015, positively evaluated Abe's remarks on the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II and expressed expectations for improvement of Japan-South Korea relations. Shizuo Kambayashi, file/AP

US experts predict better Japan-South Kroea ties

by: Satoshi Ogawa | .
The Japan News/Yomiuri | .
published: August 20, 2015

WASHINGTON — Three experts on security and diplomacy positively evaluated the statement by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to mark the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II at a symposium Tuesday. They also expressed expectations for improvement of Japan-South Korea relations.

Evans Revere, former U.S. acting assistant secretary of state, said that, contrary to expectations in South Korea, Abe inherited all the previous governments' statements.

Considering South Korean President Park Geun-hye's remarks on Saturday in reaction to Abe's statement, Abe seems to have managed to pass the "test," Revere said.

Mentioning Abe's stance shown in the statement to continue humbly listening to the voice of history, Sheila Smith, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, emphasized that an early trilateral summit among Japan, China and South Korea should be discussed.

Michael Green, former senior director for Asian affairs at the U.S. National Security Council, said that Abe's statement could create an environment for dialogues with China and South Korea.

Green added that Park's consideration of attending China's military parade in Beijing on Sept. 3, a ceremony which China claims is to commemorate "the 70th anniversary of the country's victory in the war of resistance against Japan," was not appropriate.
 

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