A marijuana plant found during a patrol in Georgia by the state's Army National Guard in 2013. The Navy is warning sailors that hemp-derived products are still prohibited under the Uniform Code of Military Justice.
A marijuana plant found during a patrol in Georgia by the state's Army National Guard in 2013. The Navy is warning sailors that hemp-derived products are still prohibited under the Uniform Code of Military Justice.

Ingesting hemp-derived products still prohibited, Navy warns

by Joshua Karsten
Stars and Stripes

Sailors and Marines could still pop positive on a drug test if they use cannabidiol, popularly known as CBD, while treating medical conditions, the Navy warned this week.

In a new policy, the Department of the Navy forbids members of the Navy and Marine Corps from putting any products made of hemp or hemp derivatives into their bodies without a valid prescription, even if the goods are sold legally and despite manufacturer claims that they’re free of the psychoactive chemical found in pot, known as tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC.

Low-THC hemp was removed from the Controlled Substances Act, which bans cannabis with higher amounts of the chemical, by a 2018 farm bill President Donald Trump signed in December, allowing the cultivation and interstate transfer of the plants and permitting hemp-derived products to be sold commercially in the U.S.

Read more at: https://www.stripes.com/1.593663

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