An old guard tower sits at the start of the Goseong DMZ Peace Trail, which was recently opened to civilian hikers in the northeastern part of the heavily fortified border area. About 20 South Koreans participated in a hike on Friday, June 14, 2019. (KIM GAMEL/STARS AND STRIPES)
An old guard tower sits at the start of the Goseong DMZ Peace Trail, which was recently opened to civilian hikers in the northeastern part of the heavily fortified border area. About 20 South Koreans participated in a hike on Friday, June 14, 2019. (KIM GAMEL/STARS AND STRIPES)

Barbed wire and ‘paradise’: Here’s what it’s like to hike the new trail in the DMZ

by Kim Gamel and Yoo Kyong Chang
Stars and Stripes

GOSEONG, South Korea — The craggy mountains, glistening lakes and white sand lining the coast of North Korea are still out of reach.

However, many South Koreans have enjoyed a closer view since the government opened a civilian hiking trail in April in a northeastern section of the Demilitarized Zone, a heavily fortified strip of land that divides the peninsula.

The so-called DMZ peace trail is a signature part of President Moon Jae-in’s efforts to transform the buffer zone, which has largely been a no man’s land since the 1950-53 Korean War, into a symbol of unity despite stalled talks with the communist state over its nuclear weapons program.

Read more at: https://www.stripes.com/1.586451

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