Top snowboarding, skiing locations in Korea

Top snowboarding, skiing locations in Korea

by Kyle Haney
globetrotterkyle.com

So, you’re ready to escape the house/villa/apartment and get out and explore. If you’re anything like me, you’re not getting outside without 30 layers of clothes and a windbreaker to keep this bone-chilling Korean weather out lol, I feel you fam. Well, I have an idea: let’s hit the slopes!

Korean Skiing FAQs:

  • Can you ski in South Korea: you absolutely can! You can snowboard too with 21 ski resorts in South Korea, the list below compares the top three places to go this year based on my experience.
  • Where are the skiing areas in South Korea: primarily all along the Taebaek mountain range
  • Where is the best skiing in South Korea: that depends on what you’re looking for! Read my list below to help you decide that for yourself
  • Does South Korea have skiing: it absolutely does! Snowboarding also With 21 resorts, 195 kilometers of slopes, and 137 lifts, the possibilities are endless!
  • Is there a review of skiing in South Korea: yep! Watch three of my videos below for my reviews of riding the Korean slopes
  • What is the South Korea skiing season: December to early March
  • What is the price for skiing in South Korea: that depends on the resort but, a full day lift ticket typically costs between $54-70.

With winter officially here, South Korea’s mountain resorts have traded in their summer waterpark attractions for a winter wonderland theme. Millions of locals and tourists are now searching for the perfect place to shred the Taebaek mountains on skis and boards, and I’ve created this guide just for that.

Don’t have gear? Never tried before and need lessons? Don’t really even want to attempt skiing or snowboarding but you can’t stand another episode of _________ on Netflix? Don’t worry ‘bra’, these resorts have you covered–check out all of my videos for a virtual trip of each one!

1. Phoenix Park Ski Resort

There’s a reason I’ve been to Phoenix the most out of all the resorts on this list and that’s because of the amazing terrain park. Seriously, where else can you find a ramp that lets you land in a massive, inflatable, “bouncy castle”-esque crash pad?! Don’t believe me? Watch my video below and you’ll see my friends and I all give it a go just for fun–we even tried front and backflips!

Quick facts:

  • Why go: It’s the best mountain for snowboarders thanks to the amazing terrain parks
  • Rental gear available: Everything from ski pants/jackets to boards and bindings or skis and poles
  • Distance from Osan: 2hr 10min (170km) by car, 3hr 30min by public transportation
  • Number of runs: 21
  • Number of lifts: 8
  • Terrain park: yes (it’s amazing) and it’s for all ages
    • Large halfpipe
    • Small, medium, and large rails/boxes
    • Medium, large, and extra-large jumps
    • Even has a crash pad for you to try airborne tricks on!
  • Night skiing: Yes, from
  • Longest run: ~5 minutes if gently carving down Panorama to Sparrow
  • Types of terrain: greens (i.e., easiest) through double-black diamonds (i.e., hardest)
  • Gondola to the top: yes (you may buy a day-pass for just the gondola if you wish)
  • Cost for a day pass: $54 (with military discount, just show your CAC or ID)
  • Lodging on-site: numerous hotels at the base of the resort
  • Parking: free; within a 5 minute walk to the ticket office

2. Yongpyong Snow Resort

Room to spread out? Um, yes please! Yongpyong is Korea’s LARGEST ski resort boasting the highest number of slopes, longest runs, and because of that, relatively short lift lines. The Rainbow Zone at the top of the mountain was also the home to the 2018 Olympics. If you’re looking to get laps in, Yongpyong is the place to do it! I spent a Saturday there and waited, at most, maybe 5 minutes in a lift line–unheard of in the States!

Quick facts:

  • Why go: It’s Korea’s largest (i.e., most spread out) mountain AND was the home to the 2018 Olympics
  • Rental gear available: Everything from ski pants/jackets to boards and bindings or skis and poles
  • Distance from Osan: 2hr 40min (208km) by car, 3hrs by public transportation
  • Number of runs: 28
  • Number of lifts: 14
  • Terrain park: yes, and it’s for all ages
    • Halfpipe
    • Small, medium, and large rails/boxes
    • Medium, large, and extra-large jumps
    • Longest run: ~8 minutes if gently carving down Rainbow Paradise Run
  • Types of terrain: greens (i.e., easiest) through double-black diamonds (i.e., hardest)
  • Gondola to the top: yes (you may buy a day-pass for just the gondola if you wish)
  • Cost for a day pass: $68 (no military discount offered)
  • Lodging on-site: numerous hotels at the base of the resort
  • Parking: free; within a 5 minute walk to the ticket office

3. High1

 

This park is seriously fun for the whole family. From sweet groomers and black diamonds for the beginners and adventure junkies to wicked cool sledding and tubing runs, High1 has something to offer everyone! High1 was the first resort I visited in South Korea and it was most memorable for the almost non-existent lift lines…on a Saturday! I couldn’t believe how many laps I was able to get in on just a half-day ticket. Watch my video below for my complete review if you’re looking for a place to get lots of runs in or spend a day with your family tubing!

Quick facts:

  • Why go: It’s got something for everyone and has the most powder days of all the resorts in Korea
  • Rental gear available: Everything from ski pants/jackets to boards and bindings or skis and poles
  • Distance from Osan: 2hr 35min (203km) by car, 4hrs by public transportation
  • Number of runs: 26
  • Number of lifts: 6 (and 4 gondolas!)
  • Terrain park: yes, it’s for all ages, but it doesn’t compare to Phoenix’s by a long shot
    • Halfpipe
    • Small and medium, rails/boxes
    • Small and medium jumps
  • Longest run: ~5 minutes if gently carving down from the mountain top to the base
  • Types of terrain: greens (i.e., easiest) through double-black diamonds (i.e. hardest)
  • Gondola to the top: yes (you may buy a day-pass for just the gondola if you wish)
  • Cost for a day pass: $65 (after obtaining a coupon offered inside at customer service first, just ask and they’ll give you one!)
  • Lodging on-site: numerous hotels at the base of the resort
  • Parking: free; a free shuttle will then take you to the ticket office area

In summary…

It all comes down to how far you’re willing to drive (or how long you’re willing to ride the train) and what you’re in to. For example:

  • If you’re looking to learn or fine tune those terrain park skills, head to Phoenix.
  • Have a family and need to entertain everyone? Head to High1.
  • Not sure where to start but need something to do during the winter months? Go to Yongpyong and learn in Korea’s largest park

No matter which you choose, each park (though relatively small compared to the Rocky Mountains in America) will keep you entertained for the entire day for half the price it takes to ride in North America.

My philosophy on snowboarding (i.e. why do I do it?)

Snowboarding, for me at least, has never been about flying down the mountain as fast as I can, or enjoying a hot toddy après-ski, or landing an Indy 1080 from the largest feature in the terrain park. Though I’ve enjoyed doing those things (*ahem*, except the whole 1080 craziness, let’s be real), snowboarding offers me the chance to explore forests in a way that’s completely unique to hiking; and I love hiking.

Hiking is an enduring and patient pastime where I can savor each moment as I slowly inch my way through the dense tree cover of forests while climbing thousands of feet upwards into the clouds for miles and miles. I get to “miss the forest for the trees” as they say, and I quite enjoy doing that.

Snowboarding is the opposite; it’s my winter sport where I get appreciate the forests all around me as I carve through the trees. When I go snowboarding, I get to savor a different pace of moments as the green blur of a forest wisps by me as I descent out of the clouds before they abruptly end and give way to a white void. It’s a chance to experience the exact same thing I’ve experience before, but at the other end of the spectrum; a completely different pace, temperature, direction, and goal. Different, but similar, and for that reason, I keep going back.

Subscribe to our Stripes Pacific newsletter and receive amazing travel stories, great event info, cultural information, interesting lifestyle articles and more directly in your inbox!

Follow us on social media!

Facebook: Stars and Stripes Pacific
Flipboard: Stars and Stripes Community Sites

Looking to travel while stationed abroad? Check out our other Pacific community sites!
Stripes Japan
Stripes Okinawa
Stripes Guam

Related Content

Recommended Content

Around the Web